52 Ancestors 52 Weeks: 12th Week August and Albert Goesch

This post is in response to the challenge of posting about 52 ancestors in 52 weeks by Amy Johnson Crow

August George Friedrich Goesch and Albert Wilhelm Carl Goesch were my 1st cousins 2x removed. August was born June 16, 1867  and Albert on May 20, 1872, both in Duckow, Pommern, Prussia (now Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany). Their parents were Johann Carl Friedrich Christian (Karl) and Johanna Christina Henriette Sophia (Sophie) Goesch. As discussed earlier, they immigrated with their family in 1876 settling first in Illinois, then Minnesota and finally in Nebraska.

I really don’t know much about my two cousins but I at least know a few things and can certainly speculate about a few facets of their lives. They left Germany and came over to the United States as young boys and their nearest male siblings were somewhat older. For this, and other reasons, I think they were quite close while young and that probably continued as they aged. August married Louisa (Lizzie) Frenzen on August 17, 1897 and Albert followed suit by marrying Mary Magaline Frenzen (Lizzie’s younger sister) on June 20, 1906.

The US Census in 1900 shows August married with one daughter living on a farm in Bennett Township, Fillmore County, Nebraska very close to his parents’ farm on which his brother Albert lived. The census data show that both farms are owned, not rented but at present I do not have documentation. By 1910 things had changed; Albert was married with one daughter and listed as head of household which included both his parents. August still lived nearby and by this time had six children. In 1920 Albert was still head of household with his wife, 3 children and mother (Karl died in 1917) while August lived nearby. August had seven children; Marie, Mable, Gertrude, Leita, Lucy, Reuben and Lavina while Albert had three daughters; Slyvia, Viola and Alverda.

August & Albert Nat AnnounI find it very interesting that on September 16, 1922 both August and Albert were given their papers as naturalized citizens of the United States! August was 55 and Albert 50 years old. They had been in the United States for over 45 years and had plenty of time to become citizens. Since they arrived as fairly young children they probably spoke English very well and were certainly familiar with the culture. Neither their wives nor their wives’ parents were immigrants. What prompted them to become citizens at that time, was it simply encouragement of their families? Possibly the end of World War I four years earlier had brought home to them the fact they were indeed citizens of the United States and it was time to formalize that fact.

Both August and Albert continued farming during the 1920s and 1930s and sometime between 1935 and 1940, August moved to Sutton, Clay County, Nebraska. In 1940 Albert still maintained his farm in Fillmore County. I really don’t have any more information on them or their lives during the rest of the 1940s and 1950s.

August and Albert Goesch gravestones.  Pictures by Larry Sanburg, 2009.

August and Albert Goesch gravestones. Pictures by Larry Sanburg, 2009.

August died on October 31, 1959 and Albert on November 9, 1959; they are buried in the Sutton Cemetery, Sutton, Nebraska. This was not a good time period for the Goesch family since August’s wife of over 60 years, Lizzie, died on September 10, 1959 and my grandfather (their 1st cousin) died less than 6 months later on April 19, 1960. I don’t know if I ever met August or Albert but I certainly could have since I spent several summers as a young boy with my grandfather. If I did meet them I’m sure I thought they were a couple of old weirdos, which is ok since I’m now an old weirdo myself.

 

Sources:

1. 1900 US Census AGG & ACG: Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Bennett, Fillmore, Nebraska; Roll: 926; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 0018; FHL microfilm: 1240926. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

2. 1910 US Census AGG & ACG: Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Bennett, Fillmore, Nebraska; Roll: T624_845; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 0019; FHL microfilm: 1374858. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA

3. 1920 US Census AGG & ACG: Source Citation: Year: 1920; Census Place: Bennett, Fillmore, Nebraska; Roll: T625_985; Page: 1B; Enumeration District: 21; Image: 872. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by Family Search.  Original data: Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA. Note: Enumeration Districts 819-839 are on roll 323 (Chicago City).

4. The Lincoln Sunday Star; Lincoln, Nebraska; September 17, 1922.

5. 1930 US Census AGG: Source Citation: Year: 1930; Census Place: Bennett, Fillmore, Nebraska; Roll: 1280; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0003; Image: 575.0; FHL microfilm: 2341015. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.

6. 1930 US Census ACG: Source Citation: Year: 1930; Census Place: Bennett, Fillmore, Nebraska; Roll: 1280; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 0003; Image: 571.0; FHL microfilm: 2341015.Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.

7. 1940 US Census AGG: Source Citation: Year: 1940; Census Place: Sutton, Clay, Nebraska; Roll: T627_2241; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 18-25. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1940. T627, 4,643 rolls.

8. 1940 US Census ACG: Source Citation: Year: 1940; Census Place: Bennett, Fillmore, Nebraska;  Roll: T627_2245; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 30-3. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1940. T627, 4,643 rolls.

9. “Fillmore County Naturalizations”, Nebraska Ancestree, vol. 16 No. 2, pp. 46-54, Nebraska State Genealogical Society, Fall 1993.

About these ads

About Larry Sanburg

Older guy interested in genealogy and family issues.
This entry was posted in 52 Ancestors, Ancestry Information and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks: 12th Week August and Albert Goesch

  1. great to see the story of your Goesch relatives evolving!

  2. Pingback: 52 Ancestors Challenge: Week 12 Recap | No Story Too Small

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s